Album Reviews

Music You Don't Know You Like Yet

VARIOUS ARTISTS ORIGINAL MOTION PICTURE SOUNDTRACK

Beneath The Darkness Original Motion Picture Soundtrack

2012-07-05

Nick's Picks: 02 Blind Man; 04 Things That Move Me; 05 Just Make Love To Me

Review by Steven "Nick" Nickelson of Various ArtistsBeneath The Darkness (Original Motion Picture Soundtrack) :

I have listened many times to this collection of musicians and songs, and I have come to the conclusion that the theme and flow of this cd compares almost precisely with the theme and flow of the movie. Normally, that would be a good thing; however, the movie seemed to wander all over the place, and the flow was inconsistent (see www.rottentomatoes.com). That couldn't be more explicit by the recordings on this cd. First up, we are treated to "Love Sucks" sung by former Poison frontman, Bret Michaels, which has a most definite Rock & Roll groove to it. The next tune in this soundtrack is a nod to the Delta Blues by a man known by the populace more for his Rock & Roll histrionics than for his blues chops - Mr. Gregg Allman (of The Allman Brothers fame) singing "Blind Man" (no, this is not an Aerosmith cover). Interestingly enough, the next tune is also a blues cut ("Good Man, Bad Boy"), but more in the Chicago blues genre. Even more interesting, though is the composition of the band - ironically, the leader of the band (DQ and the Sharks) is Dennis Quaid, an actor who, incidentally is part of the film cast. A soft-rock/folk song is up next by Gabe Dixon ("Things That Move Me"), whose lyrics and music sounds eerily like a better-known Gavin DeGraw, with a touch of Bruce Hornsby thrown in for good measure. Perhaps the best cut (IMHO) of this soundtrack album is a rock-tinged cover of an Edgar Winter tune ("Just Make Love To Me") performed by this film's director, Martin Guigui. The organ player did a fantastic job here, as well as did the singer/director. We next hear from the master himself, Edgar Winter in a very short unmemorable rock & roll piece ("Eye On You"). After a couple of even less memorable cuts, we then are treated to an original ("Shadow Never Changes") composition by actor Dennis Quaid. Now, I am not certain who is on the organ, but the arrangement of this particular piece highlights their talent, as well as Dennis Quaid's lyrical talents. Dennis is then joined by his band-mates (DQ and the Sharks) for a well-played and arranged song ("Harm's Way"); however, I have to take issue with the lyrics and the shop-worn/over-used title. I'm not sure the genre of the next cut, and the only comparison I can make is to Prince, and in some ways, the lead singer (Ellis Hall) even sounds like him. It seems that the theme of this soundtrack is LOVE, and this cut ("Love Sick") falls right into that slot. Then, just as I have discerned a "theme", I am knocked off-base by a cut that just doesn't make any sense, lyrically nor musically ("Bruce's Theme"). Although there were some really good songs on here, I have to say that this is one of those albums that I could not play from beginning to end - there is just nothing that holds this together (aside from the movie, which I understand suffers the same type of identity crisis - see rotten tomato dot com). And that's my two nickels' worth........................Nick

The Songs:

1. Love Sucks

2. Blind Man

3. Good Man, Bad Boy

4. Things That Move Me

5. Just Make Love To Me

6. Eye On You

7. My Mistake

8. Electric Cigarette

9. Shadow Never Changes

10. Harm's Way

11. Love Sick

12. Bruce's Theme

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Compiled by the WYCE Journalism Club

The opinions expressed in these reviews are those of the individual volunteers that submitted the article and do not necessarily reflect the views of WYCE or GRCMC; nor its staff, donors, or affiliates.